CBMS News

Several of the CBMS member societies have posted formal protests of President Trump’s Executive Order temporarily suspending entry benefits to citizens of seven predominantly Muslim countries. They express a common concern that this action could adversely affect the health and vitality of America’s universities, research institutes, and industrial sector. Societies that have posted protests include American Mathematical Society American Statistical Association Institute for Operation Research and Management Science Mathematical Association of America Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics TODOS: Mathematics for All In addition, several societies, including AMS, ASA, AWM, MAA, and SIAM have signed onto the AAAS letter of January 31, 2017 to President Trump.
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In a major cooperative effort to improve mathematics learning in the critical first two years of college, five mathematical sciences professional societies (AMS, AMATYC, ASA, MAA, and SIAM) have joined forces to address a wide range of issues that affect the first two years of collegiate mathematics.  The efforts are broadly directed toward students with a wide range of college and career aspirations and they reflect a powerful collective effort rather than an attempt to make one size fit all.  To help develop broad based support, this work is being done in consultation with teacher and K-12 educators’ organizations. Many of the key issues being addressed have been highlighted in reports such as PCAST’s Engage to Excel and the National Academies’ The Mathematical Sciences in 2025 (Math 2025).  Although many of the programs were underway prior to these reports, they can be viewed as part of the constructive response by...
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In a great act of foresight for this nation, most of the states have now adopted a consistent set of expectations for school mathematics, called the Common Core State Standards. Building on long years of work, the Common Core State Standards are an auspicious advance in mathematics education. They define the mathematical knowledge and skill that students need in order to be ready for college and career, and provide the basis for a curriculum that is focused and coherent. If properly implemented, these rigorous new standards hold the promise of elevating the mathematical knowledge and skill of every young American to levels competitive with the best in the world, of preparing our college entrants to undertake advanced work in the mathematical sciences, and of readying the next generation for the jobs their world will demand. Much remains to be done to implement the standards, in curriculum, assessment, and teacher education....
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Classroom environments in which students are provided opportunities to engage in mathematical investigation, communication, and group problem-solving, while also receiving feedback on their work from both experts and peers, have a positive effect on learning.  Teaching techniques that support these activities are called active learning methods.  Because there is not a unique definition of active learning, either in popular use or in the research literature, we use the phrase active learning to refer to classroom practices that engage students in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving, that promote higher-order thinking.  Recent years have seen an increased awareness of the critical role of active learning techniques, a refined understanding of how they can be implemented effectively, and a substantial increase in their implementations in post-secondary mathematics courses.  A wealth of research has provided clear evidence that active learning results in better student performance and retention than more traditional,...
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